Charming Centaury (Centaurium Erythraea)

Spotting a patch of tiny beautiful pink blooms while walking I took a closer look. Using my PlantNet app on my mobile phone it was easy to see that they were centaury flowers. I always double check when I get home to ensure that the PlantNet app is correct and this time it certainly was.

These low growing beauties are easy to miss because they grow so near to the ground. In fact they only grow up to 24 cm in height. Centaury is in bloom and ready for harvest in the summer and can be seen from July to September. Look for them in grassy areas, sand dunes, heaths and woodland.

If you don’t have a plant app identify centaury by looking for 5 petals of pink flowers growing in clusters, and a basal rosette of oval leaves. Basal leaves grow on the lowest part of the stem and rosette refers to a tight cluster of these leaves forming a circle.

Interestingly the beautiful pink flowers close during the afternoon because they are a member of the genitan family.

If your new to foraging take a look at my “Foraging Tips for Beginners” post;

http://theforagingherbalist.com/foraging-tips-for-beginners/

 

 Centaury Names and Folklore

The name centaury comes from Chiron who was a centaur in Greek mythology. Centaurs are mythical creatures with an upper human body and the lower body of a horse.

Apparently Chiron discovered the healing powers of centaury when using it to cure a fatal wound. This wound was made by an arrow poisoned with the blood of Hydra, and in Greek mythology Hydra was a many-headed serpent . Chiron was famous for his wisdom and knowledge of herbal medicine.

Other names that centaury is also known by include;

  • Christ’s Ladder or Christi Scali because of its resemblance to an old style ladder which tapers at the top. This is because centaury’s leaves decrease in size up the stem.
  • European Centaury because it is native to Europe.
  • Feverwort because it was traditionally used to treat fevers.

Centaury Tea

There are various herbal preparations for centaury but because I only have a few of the flowers, this time I dry them for tea.

To do this I wash the flowers using a strainer and leave them on my draining board until the water evaporates. Next I lay and spread the leaves onto kitchen roll. I also cover them over with further kitchen roll because I do not like them to get dusty. Finally I place them somewhere where they will not be disturbed while they dry.  This should take a week or two.

Once the flowers are dry I make a tea by;

  1. Boiling a cup of bottled water.
  2. Adding 1/2 a teaspoon of dried herb to the cup of boiling water.
  3. Cover the cup with a tea plate and leave it to infuse for 15 minutes.
  4. Strain and serve.

Dosage

Drink 1/2 a cup.

Once dry I store my herbs in brown paper bags or jars with lids. The jars are put in a cupboard away from direct sunlight. These are labelled with herb name, storing date, expiry date, uses, and dosages. Its also helpful to add instructions on how to make the tea. I put an expiry date of one year on my dry herbs.

Uses for Centaury Tea

Centaury tea may support the body in the following ways;

  • As a mild sedative.
  • Strengthen digestive function and in particular a weak stomach.
  • Increase stomach secretions and this quickens the breakdown of food.
  • Increase bile production.
  • Stimulate the appetite.
  • Ease heartburn, indigestion,  nausea and vomiting.
  • Take the tea daily for 2-3 months for tapeworms.
  • As a liver tonic.
  • Use for kidney stones.
  • Take for high blood pressure.

Centaury Tincture

Alternatively a tincture can be made by;

  1. Placing one part centuary herb and two parts vodka into a clean bottle or jar. Use dry or fresh herb but wash them first.
  2. Macerate for 8 days in a dark cupboard. This is the process of softening the herb while soaking it in liquid.
  3. Label with name, alcohol content and ratio, date of preparation, and date when ready to strain.
  4. Strain into a fresh jar using a conical funnel and cheesecloth.
  5. Throw the herb away.
  6. Label the new jar with name, type of alcohol content and ratio, straining date, expiry date, uses and dosages. I put on an expiry date of two years.
Dosage

Take 1 wineglass full for liver and gall bladder problems.

NOTE

Need to take centaury over several weeks.

 

Web Hosting

 

Finally

Be aware that you never know if you’re intolerant to something new until you try it for the first time. Therefore only try a tiny amount first and wait a day or two to check that there is no adverse reaction. 

If you have any pre-existing medical conditions or are taking any medications, always check with your doctor to ensure that using any of these suggestions don’t contradict them.

 

If you have enjoyed this post please feel free to share, comment or subscribe for future posts.

Furthermore if reading my posts are making you feel like you want to start your own blog then give it a try. I describe myself as a technophobe but here I am having a go and enjoying it too. There is still a long way to go with my blog but there is a lot of help out there on the internet.

I use SiteGround because they have a good start up deal and they are there to help when you need them. Furthermore I like their system and if a technophobe like me can navigate it then I feel anyone can.

Take a look for yourself and have a look at their start up deal using this link;

 

Web Hosting

 

This post contains affiliate links

 

39737total sites visits.

 

Honeyed Honeysuckle (Lonicera Periclymenum)

Seeing wild honeysuckle on a recent walk in early summer was a delightful surprise. It smells amazing and the flowers bloom between June and September.

Wild honeysuckle grows in hedgerows, woodland, scrubland and on verges.

Their flowers are edible and their uses include making sorbets, jams, jellies, vinaigrettes or to add a sweet flavour to other dishes. They can also be used in drinks such as cordials or added to fizzy water, champagne and cocktails.

Caution

Do not eat the berries because they are toxic.

 

Herbal Uses for Honeysuckle

Flowers, leaves and bark of the honeysuckle all have herbal uses.

The leaves are astringent which means that they cause contracting of skin cells and other body tissues. Their uses include making a gargle or a mouthwash.

Honeysuckle bark on the other hand is diuretic and its uses include supporting the body with regards to gout, kidney stones and liver problems.

I forage the flowers and buds and infuse them in honey. The flowers antiseptic qualities also make them supportive for asthma.

Infusing Honeysuckle Flowers in Honey

A big thank you once again to Julie Bruton-Seal and Matthew Seal’s “Hedgerow Medicine” for their honeysuckle flowers in honey suggestion. In fact their books are always a huge help with ideas for my foraging hauls.

If your new to foraging have a look at my “Foraging Tips for Beginners” post;

http://theforagingherbalist.com/foraging-tips-for-beginners/

To make the honeysuckle flowers in honey I do the following;

  1. Place the honeysuckle flowers and buds into a clean jar. Label with the concoction’s name, date of when it will be ready to strain, and its ingredients.
  2. Pour over runny honey and ensure that the flowers are well covered. Then put on the jar’s lid. I use supermarkets own runny honey because its inexpensive and works well.
  3. Place the jar in my sunny kitchen windowsill. Its left there for two weeks but every couple of days I push the flowers down to ensure that they remain under the honey.
  4. After the two weeks use cheesecloth and a conical funnel to strain the honey into a clean jar. I press the flowers down with the back of a teaspoon because I want to ensure that I squeeze out as much of the precious honey as possible.
  5. Discard the flowers.
  6. Finally label the fresh jar with concoction name, straining date, expiry date, ingredients, uses and dosages. I put on an expiry date which is in one years time.

This honey may support the body with regards to;

  • Bronchitis and coughs
  • Colds and flu
  • Hot flushes
  • Sore throats
  • Tonsilitis
Dosages

1 teaspoon for sore throats or 3 times per day.

Comparing the taste of the standard runny honey and the honeysuckle honey is surprisingly distinctly different. The honeysuckle honey is a lot sweeter and also has a deeper colour.

Take a look at “Hedgerow Medicine” and its useful suggestions for yourself;

Honey is great to use in concoctions because its easily digested and gives quick energy. In fact honey infusions are also great for children and the elderly because they coat digestive passages resulting in slow and gentle absorption.

 

Honeysuckle Bach Remedy

Bach flower remedies are complementary medicine preparations which are made from flowers. These remedies may help to balance the emotions and  allow peace and happiness to return so that a sufferer’s body is free to heal itself.

Honeysuckle is for those who dwell on the past rather than living in the present. Sometimes they yearn to be back in the past because the past was the “good days”, or they are full of regrets.

Using the honeysuckle Back Remedy supports renewing interest in life and encourages learning to live in the present. Its said to allow you to learn from your past experiences and let them go. Being able to do this is very important for mental health. In fact this is one of the things that I talk about in my “Alternative Tips for Mental Health, Wellbeing and Balance” mini series posts. Take a look at part three to find out more;

http://theforagingherbalist.com/alternative-tips-for-mental-health-wellbeing-and-balance-part-three/

 Honeysuckle Magic and Folklore

A few interesting finds about honeysuckle include;

  • Magically honeysuckle is used for clairvoyance and  prosperity rituals.
  • Its folk name is woodbine because of its appearance in woods and its twining ways.
  • In some cultures the honeysuckle vines are a symbol of love because they twine together like lovers.
  • Carrying honeysuckle which is often done to forget a lover.
  • Putting a dab of honeysuckle oil onto the temples to promote memory.
  • Crushing fresh flowers and rubbing them onto your forehead to increase clairvoyance powers.

 

Finally

Be aware that you never know if you’re intolerant to something new until you try it for the first time. Therefore only try a tiny amount first and wait a day or two to check that there is no adverse reaction. 

If you have any pre-existing medical conditions or are taking any medications, always check with your doctor to ensure that using any of these suggestions don’t contradict them.

 

If you have enjoyed this post please feel free to share, comment or subscribe for future posts.

Furthermore if reading my posts are making you feel like you want to start your own blog then give it a try. I describe myself as a technophobe but here I am having a go and enjoying it too. There is still a long way to go with my blog but there is a lot of help out there on the internet.

I use SiteGround because they have a good start up deal and they are there to help when you need them. Furthermore I like their system and if a technophobe like me can navigate it then I feel anyone can.

Take a look for yourself and have a look at their start up deal using this link;

 

Web Hosting

 

This post contains affiliate links

 

39737total sites visits.

Glorious Globe Artichoke (Cynara Cardunculus Var. Scolymus)

 

Here I am tackling my first ever globe artichoke. Knowing it has herbal uses it was time to give it a go.

They are best eaten from June to November but baby artichokes can be eaten in May.  Baby artichokes are tiny and tender at this stage and have not developed their choke yet, which otherwise needs removing. The choke is a crown of hairy fibres and sits right above the artichoke’s heart.

Some confuse the globe artichoke with the Jerusalem artichoke because of the artichoke name. In fact the globe artichoke is an unopened flower bud of the thistle family. Whereas the Jerusalem artichoke is actually from the same family as the sunflower and you eat their tubers. Looking at the Jerusalem artichoke tubers they remind me of root ginger in appearance.

Not only do globe artichoke’s taste great but eating them may also support the body.

 

How Globe Artichokes Support the Body

Eating globe artichokes may help to support the body with regards to;

  • Arthritic disorders
  • Diabetes
  • Gout
  • Hepatitis
  • Jaundice
  • Liver and gall bladder problems
  • Assisting the digestion of fats because the plant is bitter and stimulates digestive secretions such as bile.
  • Lowering blood cholesterol levels
  • Nurturing convalescence

Preparing an Artichoke

It feels a little daunting when you first look at an artichoke and think “how on earth do I cook this?” Firstly I must warn you to be careful while preparing because those leave tips are very prickly. I can’t believe how many times I uttered “ouch” during my first attempt.

After looking at different ideas I prepare mine like this;

  1. Wash the artichoke to remove any dirt which may be hiding in between the leaves.
  2. Remove the bottom few leaves near the stalk.
  3. Cut off the top third of the artichoke and throw it away. I use a serrated knife because this makes the process much easier.
  4. Using a pair of scissors cut off the top of the remaining leaves because this removes their prickly parts.
  5. Rub the cut edges with a slice of lemon to stop them turning brown.
  6. Cut the stem only leaving a half an inch and remove the outer layer of the remaining stalk with a knife.
  7. Bring two inches of water to a boil in a pan and then add the artichoke with the stem pointing upwards.
  8. Turn the heat down low and simmer for 35-40 minutes.
  9.  Remove the artichoke carefully using kitchen tweezers because its very hot.

 

Eating an Artichoke

Once cooked the outer leaves can be eaten by dipping their fleshy ends into a sauce or dip. Throw away the stringy lower leaves shown on the left side of the above picture. Then all you eat is the tiny whitish part of the leaves from where they connect to its base. This is done by dipping the bottom of the leaf in the dip of your choice then dragging off the white fleshy part with your lower teeth. It is only a tiny morsel but I think a tasty one.

Making a Dairy Free Garlic Sauce

Dips can be simple butter garlic ones and I like to dip them in humus too. My personal favourite is red pepper humus.

I also make a dairy free dip because I’m dairy intolerant. I do this by;

  1. Melting a tablespoon of dairy free spread in a small microwavable bowl for thirty seconds. I like to use Flora Dairy Free or Pure dairy free enriched with olive oil. If using the Flora Dairy Free I also add a splash of extra virgin olive oil.
  2. Add a grated clove of garlic.
  3. Add a teaspoonful of chopped fresh chives, but dry will do it you don’t have fresh.
  4. Stir and dip away!

Very tasty!

Getting at the Artichoke Heart

Once all the dipping leaves have gone I remove the remaining leaves which don’t have the whitish fleshy ends. I throw these away and they  look like this;

After removing these leaves I’m left with a very hairy centre and this looks like this;

The hairy part, also known as the choke, is cut away to get to the heart and people say that this is the tastiest part. I understand why artichoke hearts are so expensive to buy now because reaching them does take time and effort.

Reaching the heart I think it has a meaty look and texture. I also dipped the heart into the dips but personally I prefer dipping the leaves. Its just feels much more fun!

The heart can also be used fresh in salads and I sometimes buy artichoke hearts from the supermarket for this very purpose.

My Conclusion

Its surprising how little of the artichoke can actually be eaten and how much is  thrown away. This is because you can only eat the heart and the tender ends of the leaves where they attach themselves to the artichoke.

Despite this I will definitely be eating them again because they taste great and are worth the effort. Its also a fantastic idea for parties where guests pull off their own leaves and dip them into the sauce of their choice.

 

Finally

Be aware that you never know if you’re intolerant to something new until you try it for the first time. Therefore only try a tiny amount first and wait a day or two to check that there is no adverse reaction. 

If you have any pre-existing medical conditions or are taking any medications, always check with your doctor to ensure that using any of these suggestions don’t contradict them.

 

If you have enjoyed this post please feel free to share, comment or subscribe for future posts.

Furthermore if reading my posts are making you feel like you want to start your own blog then give it a try. I describe myself as a technophobe but here I am having a go and enjoying it too. There is still a long way to go with my blog but there is a lot of help out there on the internet.

I use SiteGround because they have a good start up deal and they are there to help when you need them. Furthermore I like their system and if a technophobe like me can navigate it then I feel anyone can.

Take a look for yourself;

 

Web Hosting

 

This post contains affiliate links

 

39737total sites visits.

 

 

Ravishing Red Clover (Trifolium Patense)

Seeing red clover on a patch of grassland looks really pretty because of their beautiful dark pink colouring. While foraging a little from different patches I was feeling excited about how to use it.

Red Clover can also be found in fields, lawns and on roadsides. I’m careful to avoid the roadside clover due to the toxic emissions from passing traffic. Red clover prefers to grow in deep, rich, dry or moist soils.

If your new to foraging take a look at my “Foraging Tips for Beginners” post;

http://theforagingherbalist.com/foraging-tips-for-beginners/

Red clover flowers between May and October and the bees love them! It also has agricultural uses which include;

  • Fodder crop for livestock.
  • Crop rotation because of its ability to enrich soils due to it being nitrogen-fixing.

 

Preparing the Red Clover

For foraging purposes I just pick the flower heads. When I get home I put them outside to allow any insects still lurking inside to escape. Next I wash them and place them onto sheets of kitchen roll to dry out for a week or two. I like to cover mine with further kitchen roll to avoid them getting dusty.

After drying I store some of them for tea and use the rest to make a tincture. I store the dry flower heads in a glass jar with a lid and label the jar with the herb’s name, expiry date, uses and instructions on how to prepare the tea. Then I place the jar in a cupboard away from direct sunlight so that the red clover does not lose its potency. The expiry date for the dry flowers is one year from the date of storing.

Making Red Clover Tea

I make a tea with the dried red clover heads as follows;

  1. Boil 650mls of bottled water. I prefer bottled water to avoid the chemicals in tap water.
  2. Put 25g of dried flower heads into a teapot and pour over the boiling water.
  3. Place the lid on the teapot and leave to infuse for 15 minutes.
  4. Sieve and drink a cupful.

For just one cup half the ingredients. This tea can also be taken by children for whooping cough and bronchitis.

Dosage

3-4 cups per day.

Red Clover Tincture

How to make red clover tincture;

  1. Using an electronic scale, because it is very accurate, I measure some of the flower heads in ounces.
  2. Place the flower heads into a clean jar with a lid.
  3. Also weigh the vodka in ounces to the amount of five times the weight of the flower heads.
  4. Cover the flower heads with the vodka and screw on the lid.
  5. Label with name, ingredients  and preparation date.
  6. Place in a dark cupboard to macerate (soften in liquid) for 8 days.
  7. After 8 days strain the liquid into a clean jar using a sieve.
  8. Label with name, expiry date, ingredients, dosages and uses.
  9. Store in a dark cupboard until required.
Dosage

5-10 ml or 30-60 drops of tincture daily.

Alcohol tinctures can last a long time but I like to put on an expiry date which is  2 years from when I prepare them.

Uses of Red Clover Tea and Tincture

Both the tea and the tincture may be able to support the body in many ways including the following;

  • Bad coughs including whooping cough and bronchitis.
  • Skin problems such as eczema, psoriasis  and even acne.
  • Scrofula which is a lymphadenopathy of the neck and is usually as a result of an infection in the lymph nodes called lymphadenitis.
  • Some even say that it is widely known to support the reduction of tumours and hard swellings, particularly of the ovaries and breast. This is because they say that it acts like a natural oestrogen. It increases oestrogen levels in the body because it is rich in isoflavones and in particular genistein.
  • Traditional uses include drinking to cleanse the lymphatic vessels.
  • Chronic constipation
  • As an emetic to cause vomiting and forceful emptying of the stomach.
  • Ease menopausal symptoms including hot flushes.

Cautions

  • Due to its oestrogenic properties avoid use during pregnancy or breast-feeding.
  • Red clover may have blood thinning properties and therefore its best not to use in any quantity if you are taking blood-thinning medication.

Magical Clover and Folklore

Folk names for clover include;

  • Honeystalks because bees seek clover out for their nectar.
  • Three-leaved grass perhaps because they are regularly seen growing on lawns. Maybe also because their nitrogen fixing properties help the soil and as a result they can often appear greener than the grass itself.
  • Trefoil because this comes from the latin word trifolium meaning three-leaved plant.

Of course we all know about finding a four leaf clover to bring us luck. This is because its a traditional superstition that we are made aware of as children.

There are also magical uses for clover which include;

  • Protection and this is done by carrying a three leaf clover around with you.
  • Repelling snakes by growing clover in your garden because this keeps snakes away from your home. The magical saying is “snakes will not go where clover grows”.
  • Preventing madness by carrying around a four leafed clover.
  • To avoid military service in the past because men carried around a four leafed clover as a good luck charm to avoid this.

 

Finally

Be aware that you never know if you’re intolerant to something new until you try it for the first time. Therefore only try a tiny amount first and wait a day or two to check that there is no adverse reaction. 

If you have any pre-existing medical conditions or are taking any medications, always check with your doctor to ensure that using any of these suggestions don’t contradict them.

 

If you have enjoyed this post please feel free to share, comment or subscribe for future posts.

Furthermore if reading my posts are making you feel like you want to start your own blog then give it a try. I describe myself as a technophobe but here I am having a go and enjoying it too. There is still also a lot of help out there on the internet.

I use SiteGround because they have a good start up deal and they are there to help when you need them. Furthermore I like their system and if a technophobe like me can navigate it then I feel anyone can.

Take a look for yourself and have a look at their start up deal using this link;

 

Web Hosting

 

This post contains affiliate links

 

39737total sites visits.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Stately Silver Birch (Betula Pendula)

Carrying on with my love of trees I now turn my attention to the silver birch. Also known as the European birch this majestic tree is very beautiful with its drooping twigs. The European name does not surprise me because the tree is native throughout the UK and Europe.

Silver birch is deciduous which means that it sheds its leaves annually.  

Bark, leaves and the sap of a silver birch tree have uses but I just use the leaves. You can find silver birch in woodland, heaths and moors. In fact my leaves came from the edge of a woodland. Silver birch trees like dry, sandy and peaty soils.

 

Identification

Firstly identify silver birch by looking at its very characteristic bark. The white and scaly bark is white all year round. Its also very papery and when it becomes old it will develop dark fissures.

The “silver” part of the name first came from Alfred Lord Tennyson in one of his poems.

The leaves are a triangular-shape with double-toothed edges. This means that the leaves have small, marginal teeth or serrations between the main veins but then also have smaller teeth between these.

I use a pocket book for tree identification and its fantastic. Its simply called “trees” by Alastair Fitter and David More and I can easily carry it around while foraging. I’m finding it so exciting to be able to identify the trees around me! Whatever the time of year it is does not matter because it describes bark, leaves, catkins, flowers, cones, seeds and flowers.

If you would like to take a look for yourself here is a link;

 

Making a Silver Birch Leaf Tea

I dry a few leaves and store them away for making tea. Picking a few leaves from a tree I bring them home and wash them. Next I spread them onto kitchen roll and place them somewhere safe to dry for a week or two. I also cover them with further kitchen roll because this stops them from collecting dust while drying.

To make the tea I do the following;

  1. Boil a cup of water.
  2. Add 1 teaspoon of dried leaves.
  3. Cover the cup with a plate and leave to infuse for 15 minutes.
  4. Sieve, throw away the leaves and drink.

Drink one wineglass full of the tea 3 times per day as required.

Uses of the Tea

Silver birch tea may support the body with regards to;

  • Gout
  • Kidney and bladder complaints and this includes kidney stones
  • Rheumatism
  • Sore mouth
  • Young leaves may increase the flow of urine

Cautions

Do not give silver birch to children or anyone allergic to aspirin because it contains aspirin.

Magic and Mythology

Here are some interesting findings;

  • Some magical herbalists use birch wands for purification and blessings.
  • A witch’s broom is traditionally made with a hazel wood handle and a head of birch twigs.
  • In Celtic mythology the silver birch is a sacred tree symbolising new beginnings and protection. In fact tradition shows lighting Beltane fires using birch twigs and making May poles from silver birch. Beltane is the Gaelic May Day Festival marking the start of summer and new beginnings. Celebrations are traditionally on 1st May which is halfway between spring equinox and summer solstice.
  • Another traditional use of birch twigs is where people use bundles of the twigs to drive out spirits from the old year.
  • Being a symbol of fertility is probably why birch is dedicated to Thor the god of thunder and fertility. Due to this symbol Scottish Highland folklore tells of herding a barren cow with a birch stick to make it fertile.
  • There is a  tradition of hanging silver birch bows on Midsummer’s Eve to guard and bring good luck.
  • Some gardener’s still use birch brooms to purify their gardens by using them to sweep away unwanted influences and negative energy.

 

Finally

Be aware that you never know if you’re intolerant to something new until you try it for the first time. Therefore only try a tiny amount first and wait a day or two to check that there is no adverse reaction. 

If you have any pre-existing medical conditions or are taking any medications, always check with your doctor to ensure that using any of these suggestions don’t contradict them.

 

If you have enjoyed this post please feel free to share, comment or subscribe for future posts.

Furthermore if reading my posts are making you feel like you want to start your own blog then give it a try. I describe myself as a technophobe but here I am having a go and enjoying it too. There is still a long way to go with my blog but there is a lot of help out there on the internet.

I use SiteGround because they have a good start up deal and they are there to help when you need them. Furthermore I like their system and if a technophobe like me can navigate it then I feel anyone can.

Take a look for yourself;

 

Web Hosting

 

This post contains affiliate links

 

39737total sites visits.

Enchanting Elderflowers (Sambucus Nigra)

Late May to June is the best time to pick elderflowers from an elder tree. I make sure that I only pick a few of these beauties for my own use. Furthermore I only take a small number of flower heads from different trees because this ensures that their beauty isn’t spoiled for others.

When the berries form I pick them too because I make a concoction which really does seem to keep colds and flu at bay. I will share this when I forage for them late summer to early autumn time.

Elders are shrubs or small trees which grow in woodland, scrub, hedgerows and wasteland.

To identify the elders I look at the leaves, flowers or berries. The leaves are dark green and slightly toothed. They are pinnate and this means that the leaflets are arranged on either side of the stem. Typically in 2 -3 pairs opposite each other.

The elderflowers themselves are umbels of numerous tiny cream-white flowers as shown in the above picture. The flat-topped clusters have tiny sweet-smelling flowers.

If your new to foraging take a look at my “Foraging Tips for Beginners” post;

http://theforagingherbalist.com/foraging-tips-for-beginners/

 

Preparing the Flowers

Getting home I shake the flowers to remove any insects which may still be lurking.

Next I very briefly rinse them in cold water because washing the flowers too much will remove most of their fragrance.

The flowers can be used fresh but I decided to dry them on this occasion. To do this I leave the flower heads on kitchen roll for a week or two to dry out. I personally also like to cover them with further kitchen roll to avoid them getting dusty.

Once dried I remove the flower heads by rubbing them between my fingers or by using a fork. Finally I store them in brown paper bags and label them with name, expiry dates, uses, dosages and how to prepare the tea.

I put an expiry date on which is one year on from the date of storing my dried herbs.

Uses for Elderberry Flowers

I am storing some of mine for tea and making an elderberry cordial with the rest. Other uses include making elderflower sparkling wine and elderflower fritters. Using fresh flowers for flavouring wine, liqueur, syrup, jellies and desserts are other options.

Caution

The flowers and berries are the only edible part of the elder tree. They both require cooking before use because this removes the small amounts of toxic chemicals.

 

Elderberry Tea

How I make elderberry tea using dried flowers;

  1. Place two teaspoons of dried flowers into a cup of boiling water.
  2. Cover the cup with a plate and infuse for 15 minutes.
  3. Strain and drink.

Drink 1/2-1 cup every two hours for acute conditions.

Uses of the hot tea

  • To excite and stimulate
  • Encourages sweating at the early stages of fever. This supports breaking the fever and the early stages of colds and influenza.

Internal uses of the cold tea

  • Laxative and sedative

External uses for the cold tea

May support the body with regards to;

  • Soothing chapped hands
  • Cooling sunburn
  • Chillblains
  • Eyestrain, conjunctivitis and twitching by soaking cotton wool pads in the cold tea and applying them to the closed eyelids
  • A face wash for oily skins
  • An aftershave for men

Elderflower tincture may support the body with regards to respiratory infections. This is because it stops bacteria sticking to the walls of the lungs and throat.

Elderberry Cordial

I thank Richard Mabey and his book” Food for Free” for inspiring me to make my very first elderflower cordial. All I needed was;

  • 750ml of water – I use bottled water to avoid the chemicals in tap water.
  • 10 elderflower heads
  • 2lb of granulated sugar
  • Grated rind and slices of a lemon and/or a orange. I use a lemon because I’m intolerant to oranges.

How I interpret the recipe;

  1. Bring the bottled water to the boil.
  2. Add the sugar and stir until it has all dissolved.
  3. Put the lemon (or orange) slices, peel, sugar, and elderflower heads into a large Pyrex bowl.
  4. Cover the bowl with a frying splash guard because this keeps any insects away.
  5. Leave for 24 hours, stirring occasionally.
  6. Sieve into a jug through cheesecloth and throw the flowers, peel and rind away.
  7. Pour the cordial into screw top glass bottles. I use old cider vinegar bottles which are perfect for the job.
  8. Keep bottles in a refrigerator and use within 6 months. The cordial can also be poured into ice cube trays. I do this when I make Persian oxymel of mint and vinegar.

I love Richard Mabey’s “Food for Free” because the pocket sized version is ideal to take when I go foraging. It includes drawings to identify the plants, advises what to pick and when, and has some great recipes.

Take a look at this link if you want to try the book for yourself;


Adding ice cold bottled water to the cordial gives me a very refreshing drink. Its like drinking summer in a glass!

Elder Leaf Ointment / Salve

I also made a elder leaf and safflower oil salve inspired by Julie Bruton-Seal and Matthew Seal’s “Hedgerow Medicine”.

I love their books which have great illustrations for identification, brilliant recipes to try and loads of useful information about the herbs themselves. Here is a link to “Hedgerow Medicine” if you wish to take a look;


For my safflower twist on the elder leaf salve, I make as follows;

  1. Wash a handful of leaves.
  2. When the water evaporates roughly chop the leaves.
  3. On a medium heat warm up 125ml of safflower oil in a pan.
  4. When simmering add the leaves and continue to simmer until they turn crisp. They look and feel a little like crispy seaweed when they are ready.
  5. Remove from the heat and strain the oil into a jug using a tea strainer and throw away the crispy leaves.
  6. Return the oil to the pan and adding 17g of beeswax stir until it melts.
  7. Leave the pan to cool slightly.
  8. Pour the oil into containers and label with name, expiry date, ingredients and uses. I date my salves expiry date for a years time.

The colours of these salves are amazing and this one turned out a beautiful yellowy green.

Uses for the salve:

  • Bruises
  • Chilblains – These are are small, itchy swellings on the skin that occur as a reaction to cold temperatures.
  • Sprains

To find out why I like to use safflower oil take a look at my “Marshmallow and Safflower Oil Salve – Amazing Natural Anti-Itch Cream!” post.

http://theforagingherbalist.com/marshmallow-and-safflower-oil-ointment-boils-abscess-ulcer-old-wound-eczema-rough-skin-itching-relief-for-insect-bites-eczema-and-lichen-planus-marsgmallow-root-beeswax-for-salves/

Elder Folklore, Legend and Magic

Magically elder is used for purification, love and is often associated with witches.

The elder’s berries and leaves are thrown to the four winds for protection. It is also said that witches can turn themselves into elder trees and that their wands are often made from elder wood. Some use elder wands for exorcisms.

There are also many folk names for the elder which include;

  • Devil’s eye perhaps because mythology says that planting elder by your house keeps the devil away.
  • Hollunder because “holunder” in German translates to “elder” in English.
  • Ellhorn because this is the ancient term for elder wood. In fact Harry Potter fans may remember the dark wizard Godelot calling the elder wand his “moste wicked and subtle friend…who knowes ways to magick moste evile.”
  • Pipe tree because of using the hollow stems of the elder branches to blow on a fire and keep it burning.
  • Sweet elder because this is the name for the common elder of central and eastern North America.
  • Tree of doom is the elder’s name in many Christian myths. This is because its often said that the tree of Jesus’s cross ,and the tree that Judas hung himself on, were both made from elder wood.
  • Lady elder, old lady and old gal because of the Elder-tree Mother who folklore says lives in the elder tree and watches over it. Legend says that woods should not be cut without her permission or punishment will follow.

 

Finally

Be aware that you never know if you’re intolerant to something new until you try it for the first time. Therefore only try a tiny amount first and wait a day or two to check that there is no adverse reaction. 

If you have any pre-existing medical conditions or are taking any medications, always check with your doctor to ensure that using any of these suggestions don’t contradict them.

 

If you have enjoyed this post please feel free to share, comment or subscribe for future posts.

Furthermore if reading my posts are making you feel like you want to start your own blog then give it a try. I describe myself as a technophobe but here I am having a go and enjoying it too. There is still a long way to go with my blog but there is a lot of help out there on the internet.

I use SiteGround because they have a good start up deal and they are there to help when you need them. Furthermore I like their system and if a technophobe like me can navigate it then I feel anyone can.

Take a look for yourself;

 

Web Hosting

 

This post contains affiliate links

 

39737total sites visits.

 

The Striking Sweet Chestnut Tree (Castanea Sativa)

On a recent walk I found several plants to forage including the sweet chestnut tree. This is a beautiful tree and produces some of the longest leaves you can find on Britain’s trees.

Also known as the Spanish chestnut this tree is found in woods and copses. Especially growing on light sandy soils. There is even one growing near me beside a path. Its no good for foraging though because heavy traffic passes it daily and therefore their toxic emissions will cover it.

In Roman times the sweet chestnuts were relied upon for its nuts which were ground and used for flour.

 

Wildlife

Bees and other insects love the nectar of the flowers. I also found this beautiful blue tit nestling within a sweet chestnut’s branches.

The nuts of the trees are important food for squirrels,  jays, pigeons, wild boar and deer.

Identification

Its the leaves that I use on this occasion but the bark and fruits have uses too.

The leaves are very striking and easy to recognise. They are beautifully glossy, narrow and dark green in colour with sharply-toothed edges.

The above photograph also shows the male flowers. They are known as catkins and are cylindrical flowering spikes of wind-pollinated flowers.

The bark of the sweet chestnut tree is also striking. It has deep, spiral, parallel ridges and they tend to twist sharply near the ground.

I recently bought a book simply called “Trees” published by Collins Gem. I’m very keen to find out as much as I can about trees because I’m hoping to move near a woodland area soon.

This “Trees” book is great because its pocket sized and therefore goes foraging with me. Its also inexpensive and contains all you need to know to enable you to identify trees in Northern Europe.

Take a look at this link to find out more;

 

If you are new to foraging or fancy giving it a try take a look at my “Foraging Tips for Beginners” post;

http://theforagingherbalist.com/foraging-tips-for-beginners/

Preparing Sweet Chestnut Leaves after Foraging

Returning home from foraging I take my herbs outside. Next I open the bags containing the different herbs and leave them on my garden table for a couple of hours. I do this because it allows some of the insects to leave which may still remain on or in the herbs.

Bringing the herbs inside I wash them as well and when the water has evaporated they are ready to use.

Sweet Chestnut Decoction

My first forage for sweet chestnut leaves was last year while searching for supportive help for my husband’s chronic coughing.

From the leaves I make a decoction because it does seem to ease his symptoms a little. A decoction is basically a way to extract a herbs properties by boiling it in water.

How I make a sweet chestnut decoction;

  1. Roll the fresh leaves and shred them with a knife or a pair of scissors.
  2. Measure two teaspoons of the shredded leaves per cup of bottled water.
  3. Place the leaves and water into a saucepan then bring it to the boil.
  4. Simmer for 5 minutes.
  5. Strain and drink.

Drink 1/2-1 cup as required.

 

Sweet Chestnut Tincture

Although the decoction helps my husband a little, this time around I’m making a tincture as well. This is because I want to see if the tincture is more effective

I make the tincture as follows;

  1. Use electronic scales to weigh 1/2 oz of leaves.
  2. Measure 1/2 pint / 10oz of vodka into a Pyrex jug.
  3. Roll and shred the leaves in the same way as making the tea above.
  4. Place the shredded leaves into a glass jar which has a lid.
  5. Pour over the vodka covering the leaves.
  6. Put the lid on the jar and label with tincture name, ingredients, and preparation date.
  7. Store in a cupboard away from sunlight to macerate for 8 days. This will soften the leaves and absorb its properties into the liquid.
  8. After 8 days using a sieve strain the liquid into a fresh jar and discard the leaves.
  9. Label the new jar with tincture name, preparation date, ingredients, uses and dosages.

Tinctures made with alcohol have a long shelf life and I look at using them within two years.

Furthermore with tinctures patience is required because you need to start with a low dose and increase slowly if required.

Example dosages are;

  • As a tonic take 5 drops to 1 teaspoon once a day.
  • Standard dose take 1 teaspoon 3 times a day.
  • For acute conditions take 1 teaspoon 6 times a day.

Take a look at my “Herbal Preparation Dosages” post for more information on why getting dosages right is important;

http://theforagingherbalist.com/herbal-preparation-dosages-hsp-highly-sensitive-person/

Caution

Tinctures should not be used for those with alcohol intolerance or a history of alcoholism.

Uses

Here are some ways that the sweet chestnut leaves may help to support the body with regards to ;

  • Bronchitis
  • Dry and violent spasmodic coughs
  • Whooping cough
  • A gargle for a sore throat when making a decoction of the leaves
  • Diarrhoea
  • Polymyalgia and this is inflammation which causes stiffness in the muscles around the shoulders, neck and hips
  • Rheumatic conditions to ease lower back pain, stiff joints and muscles
  • Copius catarrh because of its tightening of the mucous membranes

Sweet Chestnut and Safflower Salve

I love to make salves / ointments and sweet chestnut gives me another opportunity to do this. It also leaves me with a salve which is a beautiful green in colour.

How I make my sweet chestnut salve;

  1. Put a good handful of shredded sweet chestnut leaves into a small 500ml saucepan.
  2. Pour in safflower oil covering the leaves.
  3. Heat gently for 30 minutes.
  4. Strain the liquid into a measuring jug using a sieve. Ensure to squeeze as much of the precious liquid from the leaves as possible.
  5. Then add beeswax in a measurement of 1:10 – measuring the liquid at 3oz I therefore add 0.3oz of beeswax.
  6. Melt and stir the beeswax into the liquid.
  7. Let the salve cool slightly.
  8. Pour into pots to set.

I use safflower oil because of it is high linoleic acid content which is said to be nourishing to the skin.

It was very difficult for me to find safflower oil because I couldn’t find it in any of the supermarkets or local shops. Therefore I ended up buying it online;

 

Uses for the Sweet Chestnut and Safflower Oil Salve

The salve may support the body with regards to;

  • Boils
  • Cuts
  • Grazes
  • Skin Infections
  • Pimples

I thank Julie Bruton-Seal and Matthew Seal for their book “Wayside Medicine” because they inspired me to make this salve, but with my safflower oil twist.

I love their books which have great illustrations for identification, brilliant recipes to try and loads of useful information about the herbs themselves. Here is a link to “Wayside Medicine” if you wish to take a look;

 Sweet Chestnut Bud Bach Remedy

Bach flower remedies are complementary medicine preparations which are made from flowers. These remedies may help to balance the emotions and  allow peace and happiness to return so that a sufferer’s body is free to heal itself.

The sweet chestnut bud remedy is for despair and hopelessness, when there seems no way out of a situation. It is also for people who are slow to learn because they lack interest, and fail to learn from their mistakes.

The essence may help people to keep their attention focused on the present, become attentive and more observant to nurture learning.

 

Be aware that you never know if you’re intolerant to something new until you try it for the first time. Therefore only try a tiny amount first and wait a day or two to check that there is no adverse reaction. 

If you have any pre-existing medical conditions or are taking any medications, always check with your doctor to ensure that using any of these suggestions don’t contradict them.

 

If you have enjoyed this post please feel free to share, comment or subscribe for future posts.

Furthermore if reading my posts are making you feel like you want to start your own blog then give it a try. I describe myself as a technophobe but here I am having a go and enjoying it too. There is still a long way to go with my blog but there is a lot of help out there on the internet.

I use SiteGround because they have a good start up deal and they are there to help when you need them. Furthermore I like their system and if a technophobe like me can navigate it then I feel anyone can.

Take a look for yourself;

 

Web Hosting

 

This post contains affiliate links

 

39737total sites visits.

 

Wildly Beautiful Dog Rose (Rosa canina)

On a recent forage I saw the beautiful pink roses of the dog rose. Foraging while it was pouring with rain didn’t make me appreciate them any less. In fact the clear fresh air that comes with a downpour feels invigorating.

The flowers are seen in May and June and can be found in hedgerows, scrubland and the edges of woodland. 

Picking the petals I chose those which were about to fall to the ground anyway. The Woodland Trust also advises that it is best to pick them as they begin to drop.

If you are new to foraging take a look at my “Foraging Tips for Beginners” post;

http://theforagingherbalist.com/foraging-tips-for-beginners/

Other Names for the Dog Rose

Some say that the dog rose got its name because the rose’s root was once thought to cure rabies. Other names include;

  • Wild rose because it grows in the wild.
  • Briar rose maybe because of the Brothers Grimm story of Sleeping Beauty, also known as Briar Rose. King’s sons came from far and wide to the castle where she lay asleep, but they could not get through the thorny hedge to reach her.  Therefore she was also named Briar Rose because Sleeping Beauty was the rose among the thorns.
  • Hip-Rose because of the rosehip fruit that the dog rose produces which is harvested in autumn.

 

 

Eating  Rose Petals

There are various ways to enjoy eating rose petals which include;

  • Adding them in soups, salads and meat dishes.
  • Turkish delight – You are probably aware that rose is a Turkish delight flavour and one which I enjoyed very much as a child. I always loved my Christmas treat of rose and lemon Turkish delight.
  • Many desserts which are made with rose water such as meringues, crystalised rose petals and rose flavoured Panna Cotta.
  • Having a slightly fruity flavour which makes them good for jams, jellies and syrups.
  • Rose infused vinegar – I infuse cider vinegar with the rose hips too.

Take a look at my “Rose Hips in January” post to see what you can do with the rose hips later in the year;

http://theforagingherbalist.com/rose-hips-in-january-foraging/

Support for the Body

Wild rose petals are a great source of vitamin C and may also support the body in various ways including;

  • Having anti-inflammatory properties and these reduce the heat of inflamed skin.
  • Cardioactive and in the past herbalists would favour the rose petals to strengthen the heart and spirit.
  • As a mild sedative they may relieve insomnia, soothe the nerves and lift depression.
  • The petals have a astringent effect because of their high tannin levels which reduce bleeding. This means that they may be helpful as a menstrual regulator which reduces uterine pain and cramps.
  • Having anti-viral properties.
  • Supporting the immune system.
  • As a aphrodisiac for low libidos and impotence.

Make rose water with the petals and then use the water as a mouthwash, gargle and a lotion for inflamed eyes. The rose water can also be used as a douche for vaginal irritation and dryness.

Making Rose Petal Glycerite

After tasting the delicate but sweet dog rose petals I had a think about what to do with the rest. Reading a lot of articles about making rose petal glycerite I combined the processes which felt right to me.

The process I use is;

  1. Wash the petals and place them in a jug.
  2. Add 60% vegetable glycerine to 40% bottled water covering the petals.
  3. Place the mixture into a blender and blend for a few seconds.
  4. Pour the mixture into a glass jar and screw on the lid.
  5. Store in a dark cupboard and shake briefly but thoroughly every few days.
  6. In 2-6 weeks time when the petals have lost their colour strain the liquid into a clean jar using a conical funnel and cheesecloth. Make sure you strain out all of the precious liquid.
  7. Discard the rose petals.
  8. Label with preparation name, preparation date, expiry date, ingredients and uses. If using clear bottles ensure the glycerite is kept in a dark cupboard away from daylight.

Using glycerine is a good alternative if you don’t want to make a tincture with alcohol.

Uses of Rose Petal Glycerite

Possible areas for support include;

  • Sore throats and viral infections
  • Menopause
  • Loneliness

Standard doses are 1 teaspoon 3 times a day.

The glycerite can even be mixed with equal parts of water and be used as a face toner for dry skin.

 

Rose Pure Essential Oil

The sedative effects of rose pure essential oil may support the mind and body with regards to;

  • Bringing forth a sense of spiritual connection
  • Constipation
  • Depression and emotional wounds
  • Headaches
  • Irregular menstruation
  • Insomnia because psychological studies indicate that rose can lead to sweeter dreams.
  • Nausea
  • Nervous tension

Caution

Avoid use of this oil during pregnancy because it is an emmenagogue. Hence it is a substance that stimulates or increases menstrual flow.

Bach Flowers Remedies

Bach flower remedies are complementary medicine preparations which are made from flowers. These remedies may help to balance the emotions and  allow peace and happiness to return so that a sufferer’s body is free to heal itself.

The Wild Rose Bach Flower Remedy is for those who drift through life resigning themselves to accept any eventuality. It is also for fatalists who believe that no matter what they do, the outcome will remain the same because it’s predetermined.

Consequently using the wild rose essence may bring forth a renewed interest and zest for life.

Potpourri

You don’t even have to eat the rose petals because they are also a basic ingredient of potpourri.  I dried rose petals from my garden last year, as they began to drop, for just this purpose.

To prepare rose petals for potpourri I wash them and then place them onto kitchen roll paper for a week or two to dry.

Magical Roses

Magically roses hold power with regards to love, fertility and clairvoyance.

Love

Being well known as the plant of love, especially the red ones, there is no wonder that roses emotionally soften the heart.

Scattering rose petals on and around the bed of a couple’s honeymoon suite is a well known practice. In fact my friend put loads of petals in our suitcases when my husband and I went on honeymoon. We did not discover them until we opened them at our destination.

Rose oil

Rose oil is also known as the love oil. Magical uses for the oil include inducing peace and harmony, adding to baths, and using in all love operations.

 

Be aware that you never know if you’re intolerant to something new until you try it for the first time. Therefore only try a tiny amount first and wait a day or two to check that there is no adverse reaction. 

If you have any pre-existing medical conditions or are taking any medications, always check with your doctor to ensure that using any of these suggestions don’t contradict them.

 

If you have enjoyed this post please feel free to share, comment or subscribe for future posts.

Furthermore if reading my posts are making you feel like you want to start your own blog then give it a try. I describe myself as a technophobe but here I am having a go and enjoying it too. There is still a long way to go with my blog but there is a lot of help out there on the internet.

I use SiteGround because they have a good start up deal and they are there to help when you need them. Furthermore I like their system and if a technophobe like me can navigate it then I feel anyone can.

Take a look for yourself;

 

Web Hosting

 

This post contains affiliate links

 

39737total sites visits.

Marshmallow and Safflower Oil Salve – Amazing Natural Anti-Itch Cream!

Drawings of marshmallow and safflower blooms 

Finding leftover marshmallow root capsules in my cupboard I did a bit of research to find a new use for them. One of marshmallow root’s possible uses is to support the healing of old wounds. Consequently I decided to create a salve in the hope of healing my mosquito bite scars. As it turns out the salve is so much more than this.

Amazingly the salve is proving fantastic support for various skin conditions against itching!

If you’re struggling with biting insects too take a look at my “Natural Mosquito Repellents and Bite Relief”  post for further natural support;

http://theforagingherbalist.com/natural-mosquito-repellents-and-bite-relief-simple-rosemary-insect-repellent-dealing-with-insect-bite-scars-lavender-essential-oil-aloe-vera-plants-chickweed-sage-basil-plants-petunias-repelling-insec/

There are certain benefits to using an ointment / salve which includes;

  • Stays on the skin for a long time
  • Forms a protective barrier
  • Easy to apply
  • Useful for delicate skin
  • Keeps heat in and water out
  • Less invasive because you don’t ingest them

 

 

Now lets take a look at the separate ingredients in my creation;

Marshmallow

This herb is native to Europe and is also known as Guimauve Tea. This name is due to a sweet dessert called Pâte de Guimauve which is made from whipping the sap of the mallow root.

By applying marshmallow externally as an ointment it may help support the body with regards to;

  • Abscesses
  • Boils
  • Ulcers
  • Old Wounds

It is also useful externally because it is an emollient which means that it softens and soothes the skin.

As previously mentioned its the applying to old wounds suggestion that attracts me because of the old bug bite marks that I have on my legs. In fact they are unsightly and I feel that using marshmallow as an ointment base is worth a try.

To make the salve I add 5% of powdered root to the ointment base and I choose safflower oil for my ointment base because of its skin benefits too.

Safflower Oil

The Safflower herb is also known as Hong Hua because this is its name in China.

Safflower oil seems the perfect choice for my salve because eczema and roughness of the skin may also be soothed by its supporting properties.

Safflower oil is high in linoleic acid which is said to be nourishing to the skin. In fact there are many articles suggesting that topical application of linoleic acid helps with acne too.

It was very difficult for me to find safflower oil because I couldn’t find it in any of the supermarkets or local shops. Therefore I ended up buying it online;

Safflower oil does seem quite expensive but I wanted it for its particular properties that are helpful to the skin.

Using soybean or corn oil are other possibilities because they contain linoleic acid too.

Beeswax

Finally I use beeswax when making my salves and ointments because this gives them the right consistency.

I find Fresh Skin yellow beeswax to be good price, quality and melts very easily;

Using beeswax has many benefits because it also adds healing properties to the ointment. These include;

  • Forming a protective barrier by sealing in moisture while still allowing the skin to breathe.
  • Contains vitamin A

Making Marshmallow and Safflower Ointment

I make the salve as follows;

  1.  Pour 200ml of safflower oil and 17g of beeswax into a Pyrex jug.

2. Add 1000mg of marshmallow root powder. I do this by opening and emptying the contents of two 500mg marshmallow root capsules into the mix.

3. Stand the pyrex jug in a large pan. Then pour water into the pan until it reaches just below the level of the safflower, beeswax and marshmallow root mix.

4. Using a mid heat I slowly bring the water to a boil and then turn the heat down to simmer. Stir the mix occasionally.

5. When the beeswax has dissolved remove the jug from the pan with a heatproof glove. Leaving the jug on a heatproof chopping board I allow it to cool slightly.

6. Pour the mixture into pots before it starts to solidify. Using five 2oz / 60ml plastic storage tubs is exactly the right quantity for these measurements.

7. Leave the pots on the side to cool and set.

Take a look at this link for the storage containers I use if you are looking for some yourself. I find the following are a good price and the 60ml pots are the perfect size;

https://rover.ebay.com/rover/1/710-53481-19255-0/1?icep_id=114&ipn=icep&toolid=20004&campid=5338456669&mpre=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.ebay.co.uk%2Fitm%2FRound-Food-Containers-Plastic-Clear-Storage-Tubs-with-Lids-All-Sizes%2F331469803628%3Fhash%3Ditem4d2d23d06c%3Am%3Am6BM4HHkz-k_exzrgq2Pufw

8. When the ointment cools I find that some of the marshmallow root powder pools at the bottom of the pots. Therefore I take a small spoon and stir the powder into each pot more evenly. The ointment is a consistency that allows this to be easily done.

9. Place the lids on the pots.

10. Label the pots with name, expiry date, ingredients and uses.

11. Store in a bathroom or medicine cabinet away from the light.

Expiry date

Oil based preparations can last from 6 months to 3 years. I have decided to opt for an expiry date in a years time  because this is usually the advised expiry date for safflower oil.

I use my own common sense and judgement with expiry dates. If a preparation smells wrong, feels different from when it was made, or the colour has changed dramatically then its time to think about throwing it away. If I’m not sure I throw it away just in case.

Review of the Marshmallow and Safflower Oil Salve

Its still early days but the salve is very impressive so far. It is proving itself to be a wonderful anti-itching ointment for different types of skin conditions.

Personally I find it useful on my mosquito bites and their angry redness is reducing a lot quicker than they normally do. I also find that it stops new ones itching too.

With friends and family its also proving extremely useful with regards to the itching associated with eczema and lichen planus. From researching  it appears that many skin conditions will disappear or fade in time, but unfortunately sometimes this can take years.

Therefore stopping the itching seems high priority. Stopping scratching assists the conditions to heal because scratching exacerbates them. This salve seems a little miracle so far in assisting in this way.

I have been told that it is giving more relief than any of the pharmaceutical preparations and suggestions.

Basic Ointment

To make a basic ointment I leave out the marshmallow root and just use the beeswax and safflower oil. I follow the same instructions as above and just omit adding the marshmallow root.

I find this basic ointment useful for rubbing onto the hard skin of my heels but it can also be used on rough skin found on elbows and feet. Gently rubbing it onto the rough skin I notice the difference almost immediately.

CAUTIONS

  • Ointments should not be used for hot, inflamed or weepy skin conditions.
  • Don’t forget to do a small patch test with the ointment to check for intolerance.

 

Be aware that you never know if you’re intolerant to something new until you try it for the first time. Therefore only try a tiny amount first and wait a day or two to check that there is no adverse reaction. 

If you have any pre-existing medical conditions or are taking any medications, always check with your doctor to ensure that using any of these suggestions don’t contradict them.

 

If you have enjoyed this post please feel free to share, comment or subscribe for future posts.

Furthermore if reading my posts are making you feel like you want to start your own blog then give it a try. I describe myself as a technophobe but here I am having a go and enjoying it too. There is still a long way to go with my blog but there is a lot of help out there on the internet.

I use SiteGround because they have a good start up deal and they are there to help when you need them. Furthermore I like their system and if a technophobe like me can navigate it then I feel anyone can.

Take a look for yourself;

Web Hosting

 

This post contains affiliate links

 

39737total sites visits.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Kick-Ass Kelp

Here is a post about kelp, my new best friend. After losing a lot of weight last year I went in search of herbal assistance.

While doing my online Master Herbalist course last year I came across this little beauty. My weight loss is due to me not being able to digest food correctly and as a result I constantly lose essential vitamins and minerals.

Imagine my excitement while reading when I saw that kelp may help with faulty nutrition.  Thinking “wow that’s me” my next step was to look for kelp to buy and try.

 

What is Kelp

Here are some interesting things about kelp;

  • A large brown algae seaweed which grows to form dense underwater forests.
  • Can be found all around the coast of the UK and are native to the North Atlantic and Western Mediterranean shores.
  • A wide range of sea life uses kelp for food and protection.
  • Kelp forests absorb massive amounts of carbon and produce oxygen. Consequently they help with climate change.
  • Help to regulate the body’s metabolism and this is where the body converts what you eat and drink into energy.
  • Contains Vitamin K which is needed for blood clotting, bone formation and repair. Moreover kelp may help to prevent cancers that target the inner linings of the organs.
  • Rich in iodine kelp supports the functioning of the thyroid gland, metabolises excess fat, as well as aiding physical and mental development.

In fact many seaweeds have been used traditionally as medicines for hundreds of years.

 

Adding Kelp to Your Diet

Drinking

Some people stir a teaspoonful of kelp into a glass of water. I’ve tried this and I’m not a fan. I find the strong fishy smell too powerful and its unpleasant trying to drink the floating bits of kelp.

Another option would be to make a tea to drink up to three times per day. To make a tea;

  1. Add 1/2 teaspoon of the dried herb to a cup of boiling water
  2. Cover the cup and infuse for 15 minutes
  3. Strain
  4. Drink 1/2-1 cup up to three times per day

The strained hot version is better and the smell is not as strong. However if your like me and your not too keen on fishy smells drinking kelp may be difficult for you.

Eating

Alternatively add kelp to your meals. I add 1/2 a teaspoon to hot meals like soups and casseroles. I’m finding that doing this 3 or 4times a week is enough to keep my weight in check.

However everyone is different and require different dosages to be effective. Take a look at my “Herbal Preparation Dosages” post which explains more;

http://theforagingherbalist.com/?s=herbal+preparation+dosages

Kelp can also be sprinkled onto cold foods like salads and muesli but again I find the fishy smell too potent this way. Adding the kelp to hot food is better for me because I can no longer smell it.

Storing Kelp

The first time  I bought kelp I stored it incorrectly. Placing the kelp powder into a glass storage jar I put it on a shelf in the kitchen. After a while the kelp was losing its dark green colour and starting to turn brown. Also when I opened the jar the distinctive “fishy” smell was disappearing.

At the same time the kelp wasn’t helping me anymore and I started losing weight again. As a result this led me to research storing herbs. This helped me to realise that the jar of kelp needs to be in kept in a  cupboard away from direct sunlight. Leaving it out was leaching the kelps potency.

Therefore buying more of the kelp I put it in a dark cupboard. Guess what it’s working again!

I purchase my kelp from Buy Whole Foods Online  because of its good price and it works for me;

Uses for Kelp

There are so many ways that kelp may help to support the body including;

  • Building back up broken-down constitutions
  • Faulty nutrition
  • General debility
  • Glandular ailments
  • Goitre (swelling of the thyroid gland)
  • Assisting to prevent the onset of rheumatism and arthritis
  • Hypothermia
  • Listlessness
  • Maintaining elasticity of blood vessel walls
  • Obesity
  • Rickets
Cautions
  • Do not take if you are suffering from any thyroid problems and taking medication such as thyroxine.
  • Avoid if you have high blood pressure because it can contain large amounts of salt.
  • Do not take if pregnant or breast feeding.
  • Do not give to children under 5 years old.

 

Be aware that you never know if you’re intolerant to something new until you try it for the first time. Therefore only try a tiny amount first and wait a day or two to check that there is no adverse reaction. 

If you have any pre-existing medical conditions or are taking any medications, always check with your doctor to ensure that using any of these suggestions don’t contradict them.

 

If you have enjoyed this post please feel free to share, comment or subscribe for future posts.

Furthermore if reading my posts are making you feel like you want to start your own blog then give it a try. I describe myself as a technophobe but here I am having a go and enjoying it too. There is still a long way to go with my blog but there is a lot of help out there on the internet.

I use SiteGround because they have a good start up deal and they are there to help when you need them. Furthermore I like their system and if a technophobe like me can navigate it then I feel anyone can.

Take a look for yourself;

Web Hosting

 

This post contains affiliate links

 

39737total sites visits.